The case drags on (updated with Apple’s closing price)

Still in court, but can’t help noticing that Apple nearly hit $200 Monday. Oh, wait.

jury duty apple nearly 200

My take: Morgan Stanley had a positive note about Apple in healthcare and Piper Jaffray had a positive note about teens and iPhones, but I blame the note from Citi that downgraded Ruku because of increased competition in the TV streaming space.

UPDATE: While I was busy hearing testimony, Apple closed above $200 for the first time since Nov. 9, 2018.

6 Comments

  1. Fred Stein said:
    Ha. Notice your skyline background resembles AAPL chart.

    Can’t wait to hear more about HealthCare. Apple could approach $100B in Health, 10 years from now. Apple’s chip partner, TSMC, just announced 5nm process. Add in Apple’s rumored investment in 5G chips, we could see amazing devices, in the two plus year horizon.

    1
    April 8, 2019
  2. John Konopka said:
    Closed at $200.10 and up a little more after hours. Was it the report from Morgan Stanley about Apple’s health care opportunities that pushed them up?

    0
    April 8, 2019
  3. Jerry W Doyle said:
    Apple’s speedy return to the $200 range comes as little surprise to me. Personally, while I believe it’s all predicated on the multifaceted revenue components of Apple’s organization levitating the stock price back to where it should be (since it was so very much undervalued), I also believe it is Apple’s commitment to exploiting the void in the health care industry. Tim C has reiterated many times that Apple’s legacy will be in the “Health Care Industry.”

    Health and Social Care is a humongous powerhouse industry. Its GDP value is over one trillion dollars and growing exponentially with an aging population. The industry represents close to 10% of the national GDP.

    With advancements in medical science, new and innovative rehabilitation technologies along with the proliferation of new designer drugs people are living longer and more productive independent lifestyles. This fact means the industry will continue to grow going forward.

    I monitored closely workers involved in Home Health and Hospice Care to see where the Apple Watch could functionally play a critical role. Let me just give one example where I saw vast potential for the Apple Watch. Nurses in Home Health & Hospice drive daily throughout counties (and Louisiana Parishes) from home-to-home doing routine medical check-ups such as measuring the HBR, BP, oxygen level, blood glucose level, and other routine examinations that all could (and will) be done in real-time through the Apple Watch one day soon.

    Thousands of RNs across the country could be freed-up to devote job time to target other areas in Health & Social Care through placement of an Apple Watch on each patient’s wrist where data is fed back 24/7 in real-time to a terminal monitored by significantly fewer number RNs reading the measurements normally read by thousands of RNs in-the-field traveling roads daily to patients’ homes. And the data being read at the “terminal” provides not a one time snapshot of the patient physical status, but an ongoing readout of what is transpiring every minute, every hour, every day, every week, every month as far back as one needs to review. Think of the cost savings and cost effectiveness of employing the Apple Watch just in this one health care work setting example. Think of the savings to the environment where all those nurses’ cars driving the roads for home visits no longer are needed. Think of the cost savings from not having to pay all those nurses transportation costs and instead, assigning them to other health care areas for increased personnel productivity. Think of the cost savings to Medicare. I perused charges sent to Medicare by nurses and those billings ran into the hundreds of dollars for a “single” home visit to do those medical exams that the Apple Watch can (and will) do soon for a few pennies on the dollars.

    The above is the functional value of the Apple Watch only in the Health and Social Care industry. What puzzles me is I never hear Tim C or any Apple senior executive talk about the Apple Watch’s utility in other industrial settings.

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    April 8, 2019

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