Google Trends: Samsung recall vs. Apple bendgate

Anti-Apple bias?

Reader Jeff F writes:

Philip,

Here’s a story idea to expose anti-Apple bias: Samsung’s recall is 10x more serious than iPhone 6 bendgate, yet I’d wager tech media gave more coverage to Apple?

Isn’t there a resource to measure internet activity for both stories?  

Jeff

Dear Jeff F:

There have been many Samsung recalls. None can compare with Apple’s bendgate.

PED

Compare

Click to enlarge. Not seeing the graphics? Try the website.

On the sliding Google Trends scale, this week’s mountain of Samsung stories barely register compared with peak bendgate.

8 Comments

  1. Randy Kolb said:
    Media bias is a given, but there’s no place to hide for Samsung this time around. All things being equal, most people are adverse to their phones behaving like a SpaceX launch. Now picture a potential Samsung customer being excited about the Iris scanner.

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    September 2, 2016
  2. John Kirk said:
    Apple is the biggest company in the world (by some measures). That means they get too much credit and too much blame. The same thing happened to Microsoft, IBM, Exxon, etc.

    The double-standard applied to Apple frustrates me to no end. But that’s my problem because that’s the way it is and that’s the way it always will be until such time as Apple falls from it’s perch.

    Microsoft used to be the 900 pound gorilla. Now virtually outside of super nerdy tech circles cares what they do. I’m sure Microsoft would love to return to the days of being over criticized if it meant they could return to the days of being relevant as the number 1 computer maker on the planet.

    The double standard applied to Apple is a problem. But it’s a good problem to have.

    1
    September 2, 2016
    • Jonathan Mackenzie said:
      Their “too much credit” never seems quite as out of proportion as their “too much blame” though does it?

      When was the last time the media was overly excited about something Apple was doing that other companies do as well? Google announces upcoming products (which are subsequently canceled) and seems to get more love than Apple for its actual products. It always seems like it’s what Apple is actually doing versus what other companies say they are about to do. Is it just me?

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      September 2, 2016
      • John Kirk said:
        I think Apple gets an ungodly amount of free publicity, as did Microsoft before it. And as the pundits say, no publicity is bad publicity.

        It’s the nature of being number 1.

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        September 4, 2016
        • Jonathan Mackenzie said:
          Of course they get a lot of free publicity. Folks know they can get clicks if they somehow work Apple into whatever they are talking about. In many cases, I don’t see this as equal to “too much credit”. Media outlets monetize interest in Apple for their own profit motives.

          I took the phrase “too much credit” to mean those times when Apple was actually disproportionately praised for something they were doing. Those incidents seem fairly rare to me. Sure they get a great deal of free attention by those monetizing public curiosity. I’m not sure that is really the same thing as getting “too much credit”, but maybe that’s just semantics.

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          September 4, 2016
          • John Kirk said:
            I think Apple gets a lot of credit for the things they do. We just don’t notice it because the credit is arguably justifiable, if possibly exaggerated, while the blame is often egregious.

            Let me put it this way. Apple has fans who will see no evil and they have followers who are more than willing to give Apple the benefit of the doubt. We seldom hear from those groups. We always hear from the complainers. Still, those who, perhaps unfairly, favor Apple, make a big difference in terms of sales and word of mouth advertising.

            1
            September 4, 2016
            • Jonathan Mackenzie said:
              Sure, I agree with that. I was thinking too narrowly about the means by which Apple can be given credit. If you include the comment streams and word of mouth advertising from the “Fanboys” then you are certainly right. Apple receives way too much credit for a lot of things.

              1
              September 4, 2016

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