Hingham, Mass., Apple Store gets its bollards

From Cheryl Fiandaca's "First lawsuit to be filed in deadly crash at Hingham Apple store" updated Tuesday by CBS Boston:

Days after the horrific Apple store crash in Hingham, new steel barriers were put on the sidewalk along the boarded-up storefront. Lawyers representing several injured victims in the first lawsuit filed after the crash say they should have been there all along.

Attorney Doug Sheff, who represents several people who were hurt in the crash, is expected to file the lawsuit on Tuesday.

"This storefront was so vulnerable, it would have been a very easy fix. This tragedy was 100% preventable and for such a small cost," Sheff told WBZ-TV.

He points the blame in the lawsuit against the driver Bradley Rein, Apple, and the companies that developed, own, and manage the property, saying there should have been safeguards in place.

"This parking lot was only 10 yards or so from this glass storefront. It was entirely foreseeable, and for folks controlling this property not to have thought about that, and to prevent this kind of accident from happening, to expose the public from these dangers really is inconceivable. It is a terrible, terrible shame," Sheff said.

My take: Hindsight is good; foresight better.

See also: Hey Tim Cook, maybe it's time for Apple to install some bollards

12 Comments

  1. Steven Philips said:
    Any bets on the size of the lawsuit? 100 million? (My entry.)

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    November 29, 2022
  2. Bart Yee said:
    So have the lawyers sued to have the entire mall get bollards installed between the parking lot and every storefront? Will they sue the city for not requiring that around all stores with street or parking lot facing entrances?

    What about bike lanes, sidewalks, and crosswalks where people / pedestrians are also at risk?

    3
    November 29, 2022
    • S Lawton said:
      Apple is world renowned. Forget accidents. It is a prime soft target. Bollards too ugly? Install heavy duty planters. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

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      November 29, 2022
  3. Jerry Doyle said:
    Bollards (or whatever deterrents called for) are a no-brainer in their effectiveness in saving lives and in mitigating thefts involving “smash & grab” burglaries. I was shocked to read of the loss of life and personal injuries sustained due to Apple’s failure to install these protective measures.

    Business proprietors know poignantly of these deterrents’ effectiveness in saving lives and in reducing thefts, yet some shopping center owners and/or store proprietors decide to avoid the added costs hoping or believing such incidents never will happen to them.

    I owned custom framing businesses and art galleries in strip shopping centers and malls. I sustained “smash & grab” burglaries and one incident involving an elderly lady who inadvertently applied the accelerator instead of the brake pedal while parking resulting in her vehicle driving directly through the plate glass windows into my gallery after jumping the outside curb.

    These accidents and robberies happen in shopping centers. It is the same reason we mandate drivers wear safety belts, construct concrete barriers and installed cable fences between opposite interstate highway lanes to save human lives.

    Asked the loved ones of the deceased man if the cost of these deterrents would have been worth the minor expenditure by Apple and the shopping center. Ask those individuals smashed by the speeding vehicle while shopping inside the store and who now will suffer debilitating injuries resulting in physical pain, emotional discomfort and loss of physical and perhaps mental capacities to live their lives fully.

    It is unfathomable to me how the Apple representatives involved in building out these stores or the owners of the shopping center did not recognize the seriousness of this oversight.

    This is all about doing what’s right. It is a travesty that it took this incident to move the shopping center and Apple to initiate what they already should have done.

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    November 29, 2022
  4. Lalit Jagtap said:
    Another example of the “loss and damages” culture in our American way of life. The local zoning boards, the property manager and asset owners of this mall will be on hook if they ignored action based on accidents in past. The Apple must be NNN anchor tenant, and if they refused to install bollards in past, now their legal team must be very busy.

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    November 29, 2022
  5. Gregg Thurman said:
    Foreseeing that which hasn’t occurred before is nigh on impossible. Architects/legislative design/regulate for the known.

    How many store are situated as the Apple Store is? How many accidents like this have occurred in the last 70 years?

    What are going to do to protect pedestrians, walking in a parking lot, from the same errant driver?

    We can design and build fortresses, but nobody will like them.

    The outrage being expressed here and elsewhere is an emotional reaction to a horrible, unforeseen event caused by an errant driver. If events like this were commonplace the public’s reaction wouldn’t be so great. The fact is that this type of event is not commonplace. The one in a hundred million event wasn’t planned for, how many others are out there that we don’t know exist? Who are we going to blame when they rear their ugly hears?

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    November 29, 2022
    • Jerry Doyle said:
      @Greg Thurman: “…. The fact is that this type of event is not commonplace.”

      Brother Gregg, the attached article denoted that just in the state of Massachusetts alone, the Storefront Safety Council shows from 2013-2022 there have been more than 800 crashes involving cars into buildings in Massachusetts. That is only one state. If we just took that number and multiplied it by 50 states, then we have 40,000 crashes during that period.

      What is the magic number that you believe we need to reach as “commonplace” to spend a little money to save lives and prevent devastating injuries to people who want to shop without worrying about a car crashing through the glass store front entry? I’m not being frivolous in asking you this question, because 800 documented crashes in the small state of Massachusetts seems awful high to me. When do you see Apple doing the right thing?

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      November 29, 2022
      • Gregg Thurman said:
        40,000 is a big number. It is a pittance when compared to collisions overall per mile driven. It isn’t the crash itself that is causing such outrage, it is the severity of the injuries that resulted from it.

        As a former police officer I can tell you, with confidence, that the driver was going far faster than 25 MPH and his excuse doesn’t hold up. Since this incident I have become more aware of my own parking lot speed. Ten MPH is 4X faster than pedestrians walk. Fifteen MPH is speeding.

        Would bollards have been beneficial in this case, absolutely. Was an idiot behind the wheel? What safety measures would you install to protect people walking in the parking lot, to/from the store, from drivers like this idiot?

        You can’t regulate/prevent stupid.

        3
        November 29, 2022
        • Steven Philips said:
          As I noted when the article first came out, unless the driver was having a heart attack it’s very suspicious that he had the speed to crash through a window and go all the way to the back of the store!

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          November 29, 2022
        • S Lawton said:
          This accident will cause Apple millions and bad publicity. There is no way that Apple doesn’t have the talent and money to come up with aesthetically pleasing feature for the front of their stores that will prevent physical damage to its stores and customers in the future. Don’t excuse it. Fix it.

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          November 29, 2022
      • Steven Philips said:
        There are many ways an accident – or other (high speed chase?) – can end up hitting a building. How many were similar to speeding in a parking lot?(For whatever reason.)

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        November 29, 2022
        • Michael Goldfeder said:
          How about bullet proof glass just in case there’s a drive by shooting? How about foam rubber flooring just in case someone has a medical episode and falls down inside the store? BTW, are all Apple stores equipped with a defibrillator? Cardiac episodes happen everywhere?

          1
          November 29, 2022

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