You don't need all A's to get into Princeton

Posted last week in the  Planet Princeton (N.J.) Police Blotter:

A resident of Wheatsheaf Lane reported on July 15 that her Apple iPad froze and a pop-up window advised her to contact “Apple Service” to repair it. After calling the number, she was instructed to purchase Target gift cards and to send several Zelle payments. She sent a total of $6,123 in payments to the stranger.

My take: In the victim's defense, there are some pretty sophisticated scammers out there. And yes, I know that the town is not the gown. Not everybody who lives in Princeton goes to Princeton.

9 Comments

  1. I grew up across the Delaware River from Princeton in Newtown, Bucks County. Delivered the Trenton Times. Mom flew out of Mercer County Airport weekdays. Dad built cars in West Trenton. Other than the prestigious school, Princeton was a small town with a colonial history, like mine*. The residents, besides the very cliquish profs, were exactly the kind of people you would meet in any small town. The super rich people that took over Princeton and Washington Crossing live outside the old colonial towns on huge estates. The towns gentrified last or not at all.
    Touring these pre-colonial sites with Apple’s new AR glasses would be enthralling. Our nation incubated in these places and quite a few structures, streets, and cemeteries are intact. To augment those scenes with images depicting activities from the 1600s & 1700s would be thrilling!
    *Newtown had George School, a very old Quaker institution.

    3
    August 15, 2022
  2. Michael Goldfeder said:
    It’s just sad that these scams still work.

    2
    August 15, 2022
    • Bart Yee said:
      Very true but what is sadder is that despite many entreaties to people to

      1) never click on pop-ups, links, or suspicious emails and texts,

      1a) NEVER respond to anonymous requests (or in the name of institutions or companies) to send money via Zelle, PayPal, Western Union, Moneygram, cashiers checks, money orders, gift cards, etc. or other forms of non-traceable, non-recallable cash.

      2) if you don’t know what to do, check with someone (usually younger) who would know what to do or can direct you,

      3) check directly with Apple by finding their contact info and a) calling them, b) chatting directly with them or c) bringing in the device to the nearest Apple Store. In this case, a store within 20 min drive of any part of Princeton, the Apple Quaker Bridge store in nearby Lawrence Township.. Never use a pop-up, emailed, or texted link – find it yourself on the company website YOU search for.

      Sadly, this probably happened to an adult not reasonably tech savvy and no one can ill afford losing $6,000.to a scam. Damn parasites!

      0
      August 15, 2022
      • David Emery said:
        I can’t see how any tech-savvy person wouldn’t realize that sending $6000 in gift cards wasn’t clearly suspicious, particularly when that’s several times the cost of an iPad.

        3
        August 15, 2022
  3. Rodney Avilla said:
    “ there are some pretty sophisticated scammers out there.”

    Target gift cards?

    3
    August 15, 2022
    • Bart Yee said:
      A tech savvy scammer would have said “We need you to buy 40 shares of AAPL and send us 20 shares as a deposit on your repair. We have every confidence that you and we will benefit in the future.”

      0
      August 16, 2022
  4. Kirk DeBernardi said:
    As the scarecrow sang, “If I only had a brain.”

    1
    August 15, 2022
  5. Kirk DeBernardi said:
    Did we call it “tech savvy” to dial a rotary dial phone when operator switchboards went defunct?

    Would you have shipped off 6 Gs because someone asked — for any reason — at any time?

    Caveat emptor, y’all.

    1
    August 15, 2022
    • Kirk DeBernardi said:
      Your a sad sitting duck if you don’t carry some savvy in this world.

      1
      August 15, 2022

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