Apple HR's me-too moment

"I just want Apple to be the company it pretends to be for its customers." -- Megan Mohr, 14 years at Apple

From "The women calling out Apple’s handling of misconduct claims" posted Wednesday in the Financial Times:

After the colleague drove her home and helped her inside, she briefly fell asleep before waking to the sound of clicking. The colleague had removed her shirt and bra. He was snapping photos, and grinning...

“Unfortunately the incident wasn’t in the context of Apple work [so] it’s very likely that an Apple investigation would have returned ‘no findings’ and no discipline would be issued,” HR told her. “Even if the offender would have admitted to taking the images.”

An HR professional with 25 years of experience, who declined to be named, calls this response “shocking”, adding that in their experience: “Behaviours like that often come out of a culture, they don’t come out of nowhere.”

Mohr quit her Apple job as a fraud prevention specialist in January, after 14 years, frustrated by its bureaucracy, secretive culture, and what she perceived as fewer opportunities for women. Now she is asking Apple to take a hard look at its policies. “I just want Apple to be the company it pretends to be for its customers,” she says.

In interviews with 15 female Apple employees, both current and former, the Financial Times has found that Mohr’s frustrating experience with the People group has echoes across at least seven Apple departments spanning six US states.

My take:  Tim Cook won't put up with this.

10 Comments

  1. Michael Goldfeder said:
    The article is behind a paywall and not accessible. Based on what’s provided there are more questions with perhaps no answers. Was this incident reported? It seems like it wasn’t based on the language: “Unfortunately the incident wasn’t in the context of Apple work [so] it’s very likely that an Apple investigation would have returned ‘no findings’ and no discipline would be issued,” HR told her. “Even if the offender would have admitted to taking the images.”

    Is there a year set forth as to when this took place? How much time went by before this article was published? Were any of these other unknown allegations reported in a timely manner? Reported to law enforcement? Etc.

    1
    August 4, 2022
  2. Rodney Avilla said:
    “ After the colleague drove her home and helped her inside, she briefly fell asleep ”

    There is more missing from that sentence than information that it contains.
    It is not Apple‘s responsibility to function as a law enforcement agency towards their employees when they’re off duty. A good response from the HR department would have been to encourage and assist her in filing a police report. And then include that police report in both of their files.

    2
    August 4, 2022
  3. Gregg Thurman said:
    Looking at this story through the yes of a former police officer I question much about it. There are just too many holes in the narrative.

    If I were assigned this case my first move would be to interview the author – a lot. One of my fist questions would be why there was no police report, followed by:

    A whole bunch of questions on where she had been on the night in question, who had seen her that night, whether she had been drinking or using drugs, did she do that often, etc.

    I would ask her every tough question, and more, a good defense attorney would ask in cross.

    Then I’d try to verify her story using her witness list and any others I dug up.

    Essentially I’d be looking for everything not included in the article.

    8
    August 5, 2022
    • S Lawton said:
      “whether she had been drinking or using drugs, ” What does that have to do with the cost of tea in China? How long ago were you a police officer? How often do these kinds of things get reported to the police? With attitudes like that, why would a woman subject herself to more degradation? As for the story being behind a firewall, show some initiative and type her name and Apple. Its being covered elsewhere with more detail. Arstechnica “The women calling out Apple’s handling of misconduct claims” discusses items like police reports and HR response. Don’t automatically make the woman the villain. That’s why so many men get away with this kind of behavior.

      6
      August 5, 2022
      • Gregg Thurman said:
        Two things about sex crimes: they are the most unreported of all crimes, and the most falsely reported crimes.

        An officer asking questions about drinking or drug use is a pre-emotive move against the defendant’s lawyer who will certainly ask questions of this type at trial in an attempt to discredit the “victim”.

        Law enforcement just doesn’t just investigate the truthfulness of the crime, they prepare for defense attorney’s strategies to obfuscate the truth.

        0
        August 5, 2022
  4. Jonny T said:
    All fine above, but, the long and the short is that you do not take a compromising photo of anyone, in any circumstances, and then even worse not tell them, nor to offer to delete it.

    This is basic level human respect, not maybe, maybe not…

    5
    August 5, 2022
    • S Lawton said:
      Yes, yours is the proper response. I don’t care what company someone works for. The HR Department needs to take these reports seriously

      4
      August 5, 2022
  5. Gregg Thurman said:
    Yes, yours is the proper response. I don’t care what company someone works for. The HR Department needs to take these reports seriously

    I agree. With info provided we don’t know what, if anything Apple’s HR did. For all we know they investigated and couldn’t find enough evidence to discipline anyone.

    We must be very careful about jumping to conclusions based on the accusation alone.

    2
    August 5, 2022
    • S Lawton said:
      “Apple told the Financial Times that it looks to create “an environment where employees feel comfortable reporting any issues.”

      “There are some accounts raised that do not reflect our intentions or our policies and we should have handled them differently, including certain exchanges reported in this story,” Apple added. “As a result, we will make changes to our training and processes.”

      Apple is not denying it.

      0
      August 5, 2022

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