Loup TV: Intel sold chip designs it made for Apple to Apple’s competitors

From Gene Munster’s interview Friday with former Intel engineer Zheng Li.

Cue the video:

The Apple stuff starts at the 8-minute mark.

My take: The six months Intel waited before it started shopping around Apple’s crown jewels must have been in the contract. Still, is it any wonder Apple finally decided to drop Intel and design its own processors?

apple intel loup TV munsterREMINDER: Munster will be the celebrity guest today (Saturday) on Apple 3.0’s subscribers-only Zoom call, scheduled to begin at 3:30 Eastern, 12:30 Pacific. The event is fully booked, but friends-of-the-blog can watch the video re-run when it posts on Sunday.

See Apple 3.0 exclusive: Zoom with Gene Munster.

20 Comments

  1. Tommo_UK said:
    “Sloppy Seconds” for whoever gets those.

    2
    December 19, 2020
  2. Gregg Thurman said:
    If the M1 is Apple’s low power CPU, and it is faster than most of today’s Intel processors by >2X (without generating heat), I can’t imagine how a high power M2 will perform.

    Like I said before, I see a paradigm shift in laptops and desktops evolving in the next 5 years. I’ve recommend reading “Inside the Tornado [Marketing Strategies from the Silicon Valley’s Cutting Edge]” several times. It describes how paradigm shifts occur and the different stages they go through until a new technology brings down the previous market leader. One of the stages in a paradigm shift is the “Chasm”.

    “The Chasm is where many high tech fortunes have been lost…The Tornado is where many have been made” – Steve Jobs, Apple Computer

    On the chopping block are Microsoft, Dell, HP and Lenovo. I predict that by 2030 the computing landscape will look entirely different from today. All those iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch users, consumer and corporate alike, that currently use Wintel PCs are potential M(x) Mac users.

    5
    December 19, 2020
    • Romeo A Esparrago Jr said:
      Thx, Gregg!
      I just DL’d your recommendation (author Geoffrey A. Moore) from Apple iBooks.

      3
      December 19, 2020
    • Gregg Thurman said:
      I should point out that when a paradigm shift finally arrives, it happens very quickly (mass adoption).

      1
      December 19, 2020
      • Gregg Thurman said:
        Notwithstanding individual upgrade cycles, can I get a count of those that would buy an M1 Mac today?

        1
        December 19, 2020
        • George Ewonus said:
          I transferred files etc. from my ‘old’ 16″ 2020 MacBook Pro via Migration Assistant to my new M1 13″ MacBook Pro using a Thunderbolt 3 cable. The M1 sailed along silently without a glitch – staying cool to the touch. After 10 minutes the older Intel MacBook had the fan running and heat rising. The M1 really is amazing!

          2
          December 19, 2020
        • Kathy Corby said:
          Just waiting for the 15 or 16 in MacBook pro to dive in. Soon I hope, so I can get rid of all the messages about running out of memory….

          2
          December 19, 2020
        • Martin Beutling said:
          I ordered my MacBook Air the day before yesterday (512SSD, 16 GB RAM) but it won’t arrive here in Germany before mid-January.
          I hope to be able to listen to the next conference call with it.

          0
          December 20, 2020
        • Romeo A Esparrago Jr said:
          Hi Gregg,
          Reality wise, the pragmatist says later. But gosh, u really made me think about getting an M1 Mac Mini now (that’s the I-wish-I-did-Apple-product-reviews-professionally me!). LOL

          1
          December 20, 2020
    • David Emery said:
      Microsoft is apparently going to develop ARM chips for laptops and servers. How far behind do you think they are? 5 years?

      Now I believe MS could actually achieve reasonable results, particularly in servers, because of their understanding of MS software used in that environment. It’s the nature of tech that the followers can catch up faster than the leaders developed the original technology.

      When do we see Google start developing ARM server chips? I’m sure they’re working on it.

      1
      December 19, 2020
  3. Fred Stein said:
    Cool. Zhang hints at much more powerful M-series, supporting the notion by Gregg and myself that Apple will go after the server market.

    2
    December 19, 2020
  4. Bart Yee said:
    Yes, its the thermal considerations and management that would allow an M1 and evolutionary variants to run at sustained high power without throttling as needed in smartphones and iPads. Macbooks and Mac Mini have intermediate heat and power management due to their size and relative active cooling. Full blown (pun intended) full size Mac Pro’s could have all the cooling needed to keep an M1 or M2 running at full bore all day.

    As options like an M1X with multiple additional performance cores added, more integrated memory (or modules) and other performance enhancements become reality from lab to production, we will continue to see Apple’s performance envelope expand quickly.

    Then the real bottlenecks will be ARM specific and optimized programming to utilize this type of power.

    3
    December 19, 2020
  5. Fred Stein said:
    Ironic anecdote:

    About a year after Apple launched the MBA, I went to the Stanford Shopping Mall, a high-end retail venue, and into the empty Sony store. They had a Windows Notebook “air”, which had slightly higher priced for the same specs as the MBA. This still holds true. Apple’s products are not premium priced. Apple meets or beats quality products from quality brandname vendors.

    PS: That Sony storefront is now a Tesla showroom. Microsoft’s storefront long ago left the Stanford Shopping Mall. It too was lonely.

    3
    December 19, 2020
    • David Emery said:
      I always felt sorry for the employees of the Microsoft Store at Tysons’s Corner (Apple Store #2 location…) They always looked -so lonely- standing around with no customers.

      3
      December 19, 2020
  6. Gregg Thurman said:
    Majorly OT:

    One of the things I monitor is the percent of full-year revenue each quarter represents. With this data, I can apply DEC percentage (average FY2015 – FY2020) to DEC Quarter results and get an approximation of full-year revenue.

    DEC quarter revenue of full-year results is now 33.28%.

    If I apply that to my DEC quarter revenue estimate ($103.5 Billion) I get a full-year revenue projection of $311.0 in revenue. That’s a 13.96% YoY increase, compared to the average increase of 7.52% for the same period above.

    WS consensus revenue for FY2021 is $101.7 Billion. Applying my calculation to that results in full-year revenue of $305.6 Billion in revenue for FY2021. Of course, there a myriad of issues that can impact final results up or down.

    The two estimates give us a full-year revenue range of $305 Billion to $311 Billion.
    .

    2
    December 19, 2020
    • Gregg Thurman said:
      Did I understand Gene correctly (during Zoom conference) that he expects Apple revenue to grow about 15% per annum for the next 2 – 3 years?

      1
      December 19, 2020
      • Martin Beutling said:
        Yes, you heard it right.
        He was speaking about 2022 where the street is modeling only 5% because 2021 will be a 15% year. The street is always afraid of the tough comparisons.

        0
        December 20, 2020

Leave a Reply