Recent Comments

  • Michael Goldfeder on Wedbush’s Daniel Ives sticks with $200 Apple target - 'While IBM posted good numbers for their quarter, on the earnings call the CEO did not “provide guidance”, so the stock fell back a bit AH. While I’m not expecting TC to give “projected guidance” on this next earnings call, I’m wondering if providing a positive backdrop, or “color” as to the chip shortage and supply line constraints will be sufficient for the analysts questions? Remember, TC did say in the last earnings call that he expected a record holiday quarter.'
  • Michael Goldfeder on Gene Munster: Apple can raise a 5 million euro daily fine in about 30 minutes - 'This seems to be the new 2.0 way that regulators from other countries are funding their public budgets, much in the way that local governments throughout the United States would derive revenues from its citizens through traffic citation fines. Apple has become the entity, or vehicle whereby revenues are being derived to pay salaries of governmental bureaucrats. It’s a far better and more consistent cash resource than fines paid by citizens. Who in some instances prefer to have their traffic fines commuted to community service instead by the judicial branch. Apple is the “Golden Goose” for the new millennium. The gift that keeps on giving from the perspective of countries world wide. What’s next? Fining Apple for the failure of its customers to utilize developers preferred methods of payment?'
  • Bart Yee on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - 'I wonder who was doing the selling today, retail investors, weak hands who had bought in November or December, institutions, hedge funds, or options players / brokerages? Despite the pessimism of being down, at the low, about -15.4% from all time high, I don’t feel particularly pessimistic. We were at the low of $154.70 back on Nov. 17, 2021 when enthusiasm for AAPL and Apple was starting to build. Fundamentally for Apple, nothing much has changed except we lived through the holiday quarter with strong demand, reasonable parts and product supply with some constraints on iPads and Macs, and the beginnings of the Omnicron Covid outbreak sweeping the globe. From a macroeconomic perspective, inflation and Fed actions were coming as most rational people foresaw, but the market likes to party right to the end (Fed confirmation announcement) and then acts like its some kind of bombshell, turns tail, and runs away. Well, AAPL went through the same thing in Nov-Dec 2018, May 2019, and of course Feb-Mar 2020. Each time macroeconomic or external events pulled AAPL and most others down. Each time, Apple stayed the course business wise, gathered themselves, and continued to forge ahead, facing any headwinds resolutely. I see no differences today. Whether the inflation rate spikes over the next year or so, Apple will continue its fundamentally sound product and services businesses. Whether the market supports or abandons AAPL, Apple itself will continue to create shareholder value, and eventually the stock will recover, sooner or later. Meanwhile, for those inclined, buying opportunities to the tune of a 15% or more discount (or a typical year’s worth of growth for the market) will appear. Set a lower buy limit and sit back. I felt fine and slept well in Sept. October and November, I’ll sleep fine during this quarter too. BTW, the PE dropped back to 28.8 today. After earnings, it will probably drop to ~26 based on an earnings beat.'
  • Jerry Doyle on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - '@Robert Douglass: Way to go brother Robert. 🙂'
  • Fred Stein on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - 'Whenever the market takes these crazy dips, I sell a 10, or so, long-term out-of-the-money (30% or so) Puts. It’s not much $$. And one has to be patient to wait for these dips and then to wait until the positions atrophy. “Time is on my side”: 1) longer term puts carry higher premiums; 2) Buybacks; 3) Organic growth. Eg: Folks will actually pay $3.30 for a Jan 23 100 PUT.'
  • Michael Goldfeder on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - 'Apple will report good earnings and continue on its march higher, just like climbing the stairs at the “Burj Khalifa” in Dubai.'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - '@PED Thanks for the reminder! Apple reached today’s closing price for the first time two months ago today – November 24th. No reason to panic at all. As Robert Douglass stated above, for him it’s a real buy opportunity. While the sell off is unpleasant, it does provide Apple’s management the opportunity to repurchase more shares at a discounted price. That is if management moves quickly! We’ll see what Thursday brings when management announces December quarter results and March quarter guidance.'
  • Robert Douglass on Apple at $154.70: Hello, goodbye - 'Well, I picked up several hundred shares at $157, just before noon, so I don’t feel too bad 🙂 (I use these ‘occasional’ big downdrafts as an opportunity to p/u shares ‘on the cheap’, hold them for awhile, and sell ’em for some ‘play’ money profit. I do this in a margin account where I hold my never-to-be-sold core AAPL holdings, that I’ve acquired pre-split (actually TWO pre-splits 🙂 As an old-broker-friend of mine once said… You’re a genius today, let’s see what tomorrow brings.:) This kind of action lets me re-enact my younger years… well, at least a little bit 🙂 Retirement is good.'
  • Michael Goldfeder on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'The Dow had about a 1270 point swing today before closing up 99 points. From my perspective, shaped by Richard Ney’s analysis of how the NYSE floor specialists and insiders at the inner sanctum operated way back before trades were done all electronically, this was a classic knock out the stop limit orders and begin the carnage with a precipitous decline while margin calls do the rest. Then Boom! The Dow moves higher right before the close! I’ve seen this movie over and over again. After the bell, IBM reported better than expected revenues and earnings and is up $6.50 AH. The big boys also will be reporting this week, so this was the last chance to drive down the Dow and NASDAQ before earnings season begins in full. That’s why it’s important to invest in solid companies that have EARNINGS!!!'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'Thank you, John! No. It’s not a bubble. It’s a quick re-valuation in the market following the end of the tax year, discounting of prices due to higher interest rates and rebalancing of portfolios as some assets move out of equities. It’s a rude awakening for those who expected prices to only move up and a reminder speculative equities trading at very high multiples or no multiples at all due to the absence of profits are a real risk for investors.'
  • Thomas Williams on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'I heard backup beepers on road construction trucks on my island all day. Noticed the price at $155 but Monday typing assignments beckoned. Figured the app was broken when I saw shares closed down 79 cents at $161.62 on whopping volume (~151,000,000). Roller coasters and high rollers. Apple shares have been popular with overseas investors for a long time. Their kids want iPhones and an Apple Watch. Friends in France, Germany and Portugal buy & sell stocks on their phones. Massive sovereign wealth funds need consistent long term results from firms that qualify according to culture & goals. Apple stock fits the bill. Fluctuating dollar sweetens the deal.'
  • Joseph Bland on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - '@ Dave: “I’m thinking long-term.” Good decision!'
  • Joseph Bland on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'Volume as of about 15 minutes after closing at ~160 M shares. Seems like a lot, but pre-split it would have been 40 M shares – hardly a big deal. As I said elsewhere, more telling is the huge jump in Max Pain – from $155 to $170 – between Friday and today. We shed a LOT of short term options on Friday, and that’s not just on AAPL. Make no mistake: We’re still solidly in a gambler’s market, so caveat emptor. Which is latin for “If you’re smart you’ll buy and hold AAPL”….'
  • Daniel Epstein on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'Well there could be a correlation between the stock market and Apple stock hitting Trillion mark valuations. Of course correlation does not mean causation and Apple reaching a market Cap number should not be a signal to sell the market that is followed as usually Apple stock price has advanced in the future so wouldn’t that be a buy signal? Today’s dramatic fall and turn around seems to be the crowds heading for the exits while the patient investors spy a buying opportunity. Hard to time that move unless you are a real short term trader! Sell in the morning buy in the afternoon. I wouldn’t be surprised if this kind of action unfortunately lasts little longer. I often feel like Tuesday falls and Wednesday rebounds do feel more reliable. Just a feeling not backed by research.'
  • John Konopka on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'It seems an exaggeration to call this a super bubble. Maybe the market is ahead of itself somewhat. Bubbles are extreme situations. I recall a time (1999?) when a technology mutual fund doubled in a short time (one quarter? One month?). That was a bubble. That was nuts. I looked at that and knew it wasn’t normal. Should have sold everything but I was too busy with life. There may be some individual smaller bubbles going on now, perhaps there always are. Tesla and bitcoin come to mind. Netflix has already given back two years of gains. Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon have high valuations as a group but they are also producing a ton of revenue. This doesn’t feel like the late 90s when all sorts of internet companies popped up with huge valuations and no profits. That was a bubble. Even so, I’m inclined to criticize too harshly. It seems like what happens when a new area opens up. A lot of money rushes in, much of it is lost, eventually a small number of successful companies emerge. Fortunes are won and lost. Life goes on.'
  • John Konopka on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'Maybe. In this case it looks like the pandemic caused spending to shift from services to goods. This combined with COVID induced slowdowns in some factories caused a disruption in the supply chains for all sorts of goods as well as bottlenecks in our ports of entry. It is not clear that we are seeing broad inflation. Some prices are up, some down. More are up than down causing core inflation to rise. I’m not sure how we get out of this. Probably the supply chain and delivery chain will slowly adapt'
  • David Baraff on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'OMG!! The sky is falling, the world is ending, the… Oh. Never mind.'
  • Joseph Bland on Premarket: Apple is red - '“Max pain has jumped to $170 from $155 with a call mountain at $170.” The quandary for the “buy low, sell high” gang has turned to “where is the low?”. But honestly, when it comes to AAPL, that’s simply someone trying to maximize profit. One of the reasons I watch volumes so closely is to see how many folks are jumping ship relative to the percentage that remain unruffled. So far, while the volume is certainly high today, it doesn’t yet appear to be out-of-the-ballpark-high. That is, the majority of sales over the last couple of weeks appear to me to be “speculators” out to maximize their profit, not long term investors feeling nervous. And part of the reason this looks to be true is that big turnaround in Max Pain. A ton of short-term gambles got taken off the books Friday. Bottom line: The Good Ship Apple may temporarily become the Apple Submarine, but it’s not going to be any less buoyant. Shiver me timbers, and batten yer hatches, me hearties! Thar’s likely a blow a-comin’….'
  • Dave Ryder on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'I bought a few shares today. I’m thinking long-term.'
  • Aaron Belich on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'This is where we’ll find out how much Wallstreet has dumped into crypto scams as the smart money heads for the exits ala 2007.'
  • Aaron Belich on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'Well said Philip and Robert. Apple Inc. is doing just fine. $AAPL and Apple Inc. are not joined at the hip, never were. Apple Inc. has spent the better part of it’s existence dragging $AAPL to some semblance of reality since the rest of the institutional investors have used and abused it.'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - 'Investors need to separate concerns over fluctuations in share prices from concerns about the strength of the underlying enterprise. Share prices will move up and down and down and up. There have been no changes to Apple’s underlying fundamentals. No matter the current market conditions, quality always matters.'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Bloomberg: How plunging Apple can be saved - '@PED Thank you! Apple doesn’t need “saving.” In an era of rising interest rates, equities become less attractive due to the increasing opportunity costs of equities versus returns on stable value instruments. I have few concerns about Apple – strong balance sheet, pricing control in the company’s primary product and services markets combined with an attractive long-term growth trajectory. I do have concerns for investors who borrowed to chase high-flying, low-no profit glamour stocks or heavily used margin in an effort to chase big gains.'
  • Joseph Bland on ‘Hey Apple, did I do something to offend you?’ (video) - '@ David: Not even ham-handed, and I do love a good pun! Both thumbs up!'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Look who sold off 42% of its 443,494 Apple shares last quarter - 'GE’s Larry Culp is a smart guy. There’s definitely value to be extracted as the company divides itself into three publicly traded enterprises. Still, Apple presents an exceptional long-term value especially at today’s lower price.'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'Quality matters. I’ve been cautioning about the rising opportunity costs in the market as the Fed brings QE to an end and signals interest rate increases this year. As much as the seemingly abrupt pullback is unpleasant and the depth of the pullback can be a cause for concern, enterprises with economic moats, strong balance sheets and pricing control in their primary product and services markets will see their share prices rebound in time. Like I said, quality matters.'
  • Steven Philips on Premarket: Apple is red - '“…fast rising inflation will become self reinforcing.” Yup! I hope they can nip it quickly – then get out.'
  • Robert Paul Leitao on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'Tough days for those who were making use of margin. Market pullbacks happen much faster than in years past and the recoveries occur much more quickly as well. Quality matters. Some will learn the market isn’t a video game after all while others will make judicious use of cash and selectively purchase shares in high quality enterprises that are oversold.'
  • Jerry Doyle on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'The U.S. economy is strong. Chair Powell is more dovish than folk understand. Industries and big businesses are poised for historical expansion. Apple is firing on all cylinders. The horizon for a strong economy and the brightest of future for Apple never appeared so certain as now. Buy as many shares of Apple as possible if you have discretionary funds on hand to do so.'
  • Thomas Williams on Eighty-three-year-old bear warns — again — that the end is near - 'There are always bubbles about to burst in market segments. Is the price of gold absurdly high? The meme stock bubble was certain to pop. Enthusiasm for cruise ships, airlines & hotels may have been premature. Crypto looks absolutely bubblishous but a new bubble may form from the remains of the last. If the underlying assets or perceived future sales don’t support the price, pop goes the weasel. Peloton like. In truth the baby always remains after the bath water drains. A firm with growing sales of profitable products & services seldom sees shares fall very far for very long. Reporting record earnings in the middle of a perceived crisis, priceless! Even record earnings will get the share price temporarily punished if no future numbers are devined. I do wonder why maelstroms erupt on cue just before Apple earnings. Steady markets for weeks then here comes earnings season, let’s all have a convenient sell-off until the dust settles after Earnings.'