Recent Comments

  • David Emery on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'I see your arguments as mostly ad-hominem, a “threat to profits” as the only motivation. It’s clear that unionization brings an adversarial relationship to employee relations, and substantially hinders the company’s freedom in establishing working conditions. Now unions argue “that’s a good thing” and I understand the validity of that argument. But as I read once, “You don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.” Unionization may well produce benefits for the union workers above what the company offers, but that has to be balanced against what the company might offer in the absence of adversarial negotiations. Personally, as I’ve said before, I’m not happy with the current Apple Store experience. And as a customer, I’m not convinced that unionization will change that for the better (and might make it worse.) Now that’s not the direct purpose of an employee union, but it is a concern for the company and -should be- a concern for employees.'
  • Jerry Doyle on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'Is it my aging eyes PED, or is that picture above “blurry?” 🙂'
  • Thomas Williams on Premarket: Apple is red - '$144. Another Sucker Rally (refraining from references to levitating dead felines) or not? We made it beyond $149 last Tuesday only to watch it slide to mid 130s, again. $143 on Monday looked like the start of positive movement. In March the share price surged $25 in 2 weeks. There must be a $ trillion sitting on the sidelines or hunkered down in dividend stocks like the Ma Bells, and some utilities. 5% is no match for the 8.5 increase in the CPI as of March, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For some reason I cannot stomach going long in OXY, XOM or other dirty shares despite them being up 50 to 120% YTD by stealing the contents of everyone’s wallets and sending 1/2 the proceeds to evil dominions.'
  • Hugh Lovell on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - '10:10 am, Pacific: AAPL is $144.12. Up almost 2.6%.'
  • Steven Philips on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'This is as it should be. And IF there are more than normal benefits there should be higher expectations of quality in the work force. This is where unions often get it wrong. A Formula 1 team wouldn’t just hire union mechanics.'
  • Tom Farris on Apple raises starting pay to $22 an hour - 'Nausea before breakfast, how novel…'
  • Joseph Bland on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'This morning, AAPL opened at 137.12, way down. But it’s the tiny premarket tail once again attempting to wag the AAPL dog. Did the shorties get word of this “story” and do their damndest to sink the stock, hoping to stampede the AAPL market? If so, I hope they lose their short little shirts.'
  • Thomas Williams on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - '“Apple didn’t immediately respond to request for comment on its production plans.” Find a successful company willing to seriously comment on future production plans. Clickbait ubiquity as desperate robots compete to write the most inane sentences. Nary a copy editor in sight nor a cyborg. Robots are now the most active traders on major stock markets, exaggerating every share price movement. Heinlein, Orwell and Aldous Huxley could hardly imagine the unnatural dystopia we try to exist in now. Makes sense to be cycling along a scenic river in the Bohemian Massif.'
  • Jerry Doyle on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'We go through this seemingly every year on the release of confidential information on the lower number of units. And most every year we learn later the spill was wrong.'
  • Jerry Doyle on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - '“…. They (Apple workers) also want Apple, the world’s most valuable company, to share more of its profits with frontline workers who sell iPhones, MacBooks, and iPads.” The Department of Labor has a large volume that contains all the jobs classified in the United States, describing with specificity the physical and mental skills needed to do the work tasks in each specific job. Job placement recruiters, VR Counselors, and some allied health professionals use the huge volumes to study specific jobs to decide the needed physical and mental capacity required to perform the positions. (I suspect attorneys representing applicants turned down for SSDI benefits use the “Dictionary of Occupational Titles,” too). So, a retail sales clerk for one retail outlet requires the same or similar level of physical and mental capacities as a retail salesperson does in other retail outlets to do the similar job. It is for this reason their pay often is commensurate or comparable. A barber can only command a certain level of salary based on the requisite skills needed to do the job. Same for a house painter, a plumber, an electrician, a welder, etc. For Apple workers to demand more pay because their company is more profitable is socialism where workers demand to share in the profits. Apple workers’ pay is predicated on the salary level for workers in that vocational field (retail sales clerk), not on the profits of the company, per se.'
  • Fred Stein on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'On Glassdoor, employees give Apple an overall approval of 4.2 out of 5. For investors, the impact will be minimal to zero. Statistics, random distribution, says there may (or may not) be a few pockets, a few locations, where there’s enough votes for the union. Deirdre’s point holds. In Apple’s case, unions are not likely to make things better for employees. With other employers, unions may be the best option for employees.'
  • Daniel Epstein on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'Another unverifiable rumor. Apple doesn’t release IPhone unit numbers. Whose Market forecast is 240 million. An average of guesses? By the way what is the mix of types of phones. If other rumors about Apple SE demand are true then Apple could be building more profitable units. Revenue is the only real measurement and units doesn’t tell us that without the sale price.'
  • Greg Lippert on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'Even if true (which I also take salty), Apple should easily support at these stock prices. And its all temporary, not Apple made but macroeconomics.'
  • Greg Bates on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'Why not take a scientific view? There are 272 Apple stores in the US. (As someone who lives in rural Maine, I wish there were more!) If a union would be as problematic for employees as O’Brien predicts, that should become clear to employees once one is established in one store, or a handful of them. Then workers can stop spreading unionization once it becomes the bad choice based on employee experience. O’Brien’s view is suspect as it echoes the standard reaction companies have to unions: suggesting the company fears for the welfare of employees while masking a very real fear for profits–worry that working people might gain new say over their work lives in ways that will impinge on those margins. If O’Brien’s concern is genuinely for those working in the stores, why not show she is right by taking a more wait-and-see attitude rather than proffering the traditional arguments of so many companies? Unionization might have an upside: employee retention. If the tight labor market is permanent, that could be good for Apple–and its investors.'
  • Miguel Ancira on Here’s why Apple turned red Thursday - 'I don’t believe the reports…and even if true, I do not see peole cutting back on services….the installed base is getting ‘too big to fail’.'
  • Jerry Doyle on Apple raises starting pay to $22 an hour - '“…. My take: That’s one way to fight a union.” While pay in the media seems the primary driver in Labor-management negotiations, bargaining among the parties often focuses more on working conditions. Workers will be the first to say they crave more benefits from flexible work hours, work arrangements, discretionary annual leave for employees when they prefer, additional sick & enhanced health benefits, increased per diem and other related travel benefits, access to more educational, in-service training, staff development and other career development opportunities within the organization, more employee input into designing performance appraisals, better equipment along with improved working environment, enhanced safety procedures, and so on. It is not just about pay, per se. Within the industrialized nations, Unions have been the most powerful force in building social protections, not just for their own members but for all society. The benefits one often gain in their jobs come not from the benevolence and gratuitous kindness of management and the Employer, but from workers who most often have too demand it through various manifested behavioral acts.'
  • Steven Philips on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'I’ll go with Deirdre, not a union organizer who gets an upset tummy when he doesn’t get his way!'
  • Michael Goldfeder on Apple raises starting pay to $22 an hour - 'But according to the unidentified anonymous “Union” organizers, Apple’s still $8.00 short. Time for Mark Gurman to step up with a human interest story from Jimmy Hoffa’s grandchildren on how disappointed they are in Apple’s paltry employees’ raise.'
  • Joseph Bland on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - '“…favored by employers looking to crush unionization efforts among their workers.” Oops! Someone’s personal bias is showing…. I’m generally in favor of unions because I’ve seen how individuals get screwed. Near as I can tell, no direct hire workers are getting screwed by Apple. I can’t say the same for contract workers….'
  • Michael Goldfeder on What Apple’s VP of People is telling her people about unions (audio) - 'When I read this comment: “It turned my stomach,” an Apple retail worker and union organizer who viewed the video and requested to remain anonymous, said. “As someone who genuinely likes my company, but is working to organize my store to hold it to its values, I’m disappointed not only in what was said in the video, but also in how convincing it will be to some people that are on the fence.” It highlights the fact that those organizing a “Union” are apparently rather insecure. Why fear all sides providing input?'
  • Kirk DeBernardi on Barron’s: Why Apple is making investors skittish - '“Eric’s (desire for clicks) piece was overtaken by events.” Or how about, “…overtaken by the savvy investor’s realization of ongoing base fundamentals? Click THAT.'
  • Thomas Williams on Barron’s: Why Apple is making investors skittish - 'We must remember iPhone releases were only delayed by a few weeks during 2020. I realize these are different challenges now but lockdowns were everywhere in 2020. Apple still released iPhone that year and the next. They learned how to produce under difficult conditions, WFA and not being able to go to China as often as before. Suppliers are key but Mr. Cook’s team seems to work several steps ahead of the competition.'
  • Thomas Williams on Premarket: Apple is red - 'The near Apple Future is here: developerdotappledotcom/documentation/ Always inclusive, there are new features for every product, additional right to left language support, and audio graphs for the blind. I’m working my way through how to design an inclusive app, ground-breaking stuff. Free sample code, always popular and a great learning resource. Swift UI gets even better graphics features. “Swift has built-in support for writing asynchronous and parallel code in a structured way. Asynchronous code.” Also ground-breaking, the app can keep functioning during app updates.'
  • Daniel Epstein on Barron’s: Why Apple is making investors skittish - 'While there are plenty of reasons to worry that the Macro environment around the world and China specifically is causing Apple supply chain issues these wall of worry creators are confusing rumors (where there are a lot) and facts (of which there are few). Using metrics which can’t be measured or checked so they can create a narrative is the state of media coverage and business analysts these days. From what I can tell the Apple 14 line might not be released at the usual end of September timeframe. Been there and done that. Some people think the demand may not be as robust as the Iphone 13. Might as well sell everything as the possibility of something bad happens exists. Apple is just the type of company with extensive cash reserves and great profitability that long term will be successful. But it won’t be smooth sailing all the time.'
  • Mordechai Beizer on Premarket: Apple is red - '@Joseph Ford and GM have CDP ratings of A while Apple has an A-. That sounds strange to me, but hey, if investing in Ford and GM is better for the environment than investing in Apple who am I to argue with these “objective” measures.'
  • Steven Philips on Premarket: Apple is red - 'Did I notice a “Swift”ly in Apple’s WWDC announcement?'
  • Thomas Williams on Biking down the Danube - 'Vienna waits for you.'
  • Thomas Williams on Premarket: Apple is red - 'According to Apple there are 30 million developers who work on Apple apps. Most are employed by smaller app development firms or maybe even solo. They study Swift and Apple’s framework, which is constantly being improved. Beyond games & dating, they develop apps for organizations with diverse requirements. Every few years I peruse the topics and documents made available to WWDC participants. As a former instructor of C++, Visual Basic and Forté app development I can identify the various resources & tell you Apple invests heavily in making it easier to make inclusive apps for many audiences. Collaboration is a primary focus. Light years ahead of the toolboxes my students were given.'
  • Brian Loftus on Premarket: Apple is red - 'Actually, the cost to the economy of climate change is much less than the current cost of mitigation per the last IPCC report. It also appears that we are less than a decade away from having the battery storage technology needed to move to renewable energy for electricity. We already have the technology now for long distance trucking to be net negative carbon (per California’s calculation for bioCNG). Punishing the world with high oil prices as a matter of policy is a really bad idea pre and post Putin invasion.'
  • Ken Cheng on Biking down the Danube - 'Very jealous!'