'We asked 631 Americans to pick their favorite smartphone brand'

From Rahul Srinivas' "Nearly 59% Of People Said This Company Makes The Best Smartphones" posted Monday on SlashGear:

We asked 631 Americans to pick their favorite smartphone brand and four took the top slots: Apple, Google, Samsung, and OnePlus. The results of the poll did not come as a surprise because the vast majority of the 631 people voted for Apple as the maker of the best smartphones on the market. A massive 58.95% of the people who participated in the poll preferred Apple-made iPhones to any other smartphone brand. Thanks to its lineup of excellent mid-range A series devices and capable flagship phones from the Galaxy S22 lineup, Samsung managed to garner a respectable 31.06% of the votes to end up in the second spot. The company is the only brand on the list that makes foldable smartphones, which is an emerging category in itself.

Despite being infamous for some notable software-related bugs, a sizable percentage of Americans still prefer Google-made devices like the Pixel 5 and the newer Pixel 6 series phones. Among those polled, 8.24% thought Googe makes the best smartphones. It would be interesting to see if Google raises the bar if and when it launches the much-rumored foldable smartphone later this year. The only Chinese smartphone brand on this list is OnePlus, which is a tad surprising, though it managed to garner just 1.74% of the votes. From the results, it's evident that OnePlus — despite having a presence in the U.S. for a long time now — is yet to make a sizable impact on the psyche of the average American consumer. However, at the recent launch of the OnePlus 10T, the company did attempt to show that it is in the U.S. for the long term.

My take: Only 58.95%? That's less than the iPhone's U.S. market share (62% in Q1 2022 according to Counterpoint).

14 Comments

  1. David Emery said:
    Yeah, that result is statistically surprising. I wonder if there’s more to the survey than just this one question (that would explain the apparent anomaly.) In particular, those who own an iPhone and don’t think it’s the best, why do they still own an iPhone? 🙂

    1
    August 9, 2022
  2. Helpful, to understand how each firm is playing to certain market segments. I prefer to see Google Pixel, Samsung and most other smartphones as simply iterations of Android. From that perspective Apple iOS devices are well under 50% of all smartphones in-use, worldwide. This POV keeps the circling Khans, Klobuchars and Vestagers at bay. It also leaves lots of space for Apples to grow in the garden. We know who builds a higher quality handset.

    3
    August 9, 2022
    • David Emery said:
      But This Survey was of “631 Americans”.

      1
      August 9, 2022
  3. Neal Guttenberg said:
    If you put it a different way, nearly 6 out of 10 Americans think the iPhone is the best phone. And 3 out of 10 think Samsung is the best. 1 out of 10 think the best is something else.

    Interesting things with polls. They depend on who you ask and how you ask the question. Both things can influence the outcomes. I think that whatever cell phone you have, you would like to think it is the best one so this poll, to a degree, probably has some confirmation bias in it. If Apple ownership is properly represented in this poll, then, by using Counterpoint’s numbers, and assuming Apple owners will be the ones mostly voting for Apple, probably around 90%+ of iPhone owners think the iPhone is the best phone. That is actually a pretty good number. I do wonder if they asked which phone people use and related that to how they voted. That would be important to report on as well.

    1
    August 9, 2022
  4. Chris De Armond said:
    With no info about the composition of those surveyed, the survey is of little use. Apple is high end consumer biased. What is the economic cross section of the survey?

    2
    August 9, 2022
    • Fred Stein said:
      Thanks Timothy. I upvoted.

      Clearly there is some sample bias. Note also, the author revealed nothing about their sampling technique.

      0
      August 9, 2022
      • David Emery said:
        A really useful survey would have then asked, “Do you have a phone made by the company who you say makes the best phone?” And then some questions to tease out why not, if the answer is no.

        But yeah, I’m a little suspicious of the polling/sampling method here, just because I’d expect much tighter correlation between “best brand” and “brand I own.”

        0
        August 9, 2022
  5. John Konopka said:
    LOL. 58.95% thought Apple the best. Not 58.96% or 58.94%. In my work we deal with the significance of our results all the time. Just because you can crank the numbers and print out multiple decimal places doesn’t make them significant.

    The survey is maybe OK if you squint and just say that a majority think Apple the best. That is useful information.

    As to owning your phone, lots of people have phones given to them by employers or family members so that has to be accounted for.

    As for results at the low end, I took a class on human behavior where various ideas were tested by surveys. The teacher made on off-hand remark that you shouldn’t put to much stock in values at the low end. He said it wasn’t hard to get 10 or 15% of people to go along with almost anything in a survey. Maybe they weren’t paying attention, maybe the question was confusing, maybe they checked the wrong box by mistake, maybe they were just having an off day.

    1
    August 9, 2022
    • David Emery said:
      One person is worth .15% in this survey 🙂 372 of the 631 selected Apple.

      2
      August 9, 2022
  6. Michael Goldfeder said:
    I don’t know about anyone else on this platform, but I’ve never been contacted for any survey be it for a service, politics, or breakfast cereal. Hence, it’s all BS in my opinion. I just look around on my daily ventures and see nothing but iPhones, iPads, and ear pods everywhere I go. Perhaps a Galaxy here and there, but the overwhelming majority are Apple products.

    1
    August 9, 2022
    • Steven Philips said:
      I was once. Political. I kept trying to clarify their questions! Didn’t go well 🙁

      1
      August 9, 2022
      • David Emery said:
        There’s this concept called “push polling” that’s really political campaigning in disguise, by asking leading questions. “Next question, sir. When did you stop beating your wife?”

        1
        August 10, 2022

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