Apple's new features: Virtuous cycle or red meat for regulators?

Two ways of looking at the news out of WWDC 2022.

From Loup Venture's Gene Munster: "The Virtues of Integrated Hardware-Software On Display":

While WWDC lacked a headline-grabbing announcement, the keynote still delivered on the substance of what makes Apple great for consumers and investors. It's their continued ability to innovate around vertically integrated hardware and software. And, developers are on board, as seen by Apple growing its registered developer base by 20% to 34m, despite the headlines about developer unrest.

From The Information's Martin Peers ($):

Antitrust regulators of course will interpret many of Apple’s announcements through a more disapproving lens, focused on the competitive dangers that flow from “dominant digital platforms” like Apple marketing their own goods and services on their platforms...

What should worry regulators—and consumers—are the privacy implications of Apple’s steady expansion of iOS into areas like drivers’ licenses and (as announced today) ID verification. Despite what Apple executives would have you believe, there is a lot of evidence that iPhones are highly insecure devices. Should you really concentrate all your private information on a device that criminals can so easily tap into?

My take: I saw Peers' take before I watched the keynote, which made me hyper aware of all the new ways Apple is pulling users deeper into their ecosystem. On the other hand, his suggestion that iPhones are particularly insecure is way, way off base.

12 Comments

  1. Fred Stein said:
    20% increase in developers. And still some claim Apple’s closed system stifles innovation.

    34 million developers means more Mac sales, more upgrades to the latest high performance, long battery-life Macs.

    This is a testament to Tim’s vision and values. Relentless pursuing inclusion, they expand the base of developers helping people help themselves, while boosting sales of Apple products and increasing services revenue.

    4
    June 7, 2022
  2. Alan Trerise said:
    Are we seeing the last annual WWDC? With 34M developers it’s no longer realistic to get even a fraction of them together in the same place. It’s also expensive and disruptive to engineering schedules. With the new video based format, features can be rolled out as available rather than all at once in a conference hall. The only reason for the event based rollout is for marketing purposes.

    3
    June 7, 2022
  3. Lalit Jagtap said:
    The developer conference is more than learning about APIs and product launches. It’s about celebrating and connecting and experiencing as a community.

    5
    June 7, 2022
  4. Timothy Smith said:
    I didn’t see anything that COULD be regulated. Every new feature is free, and flows from integration of hardware and software. The App Store cut seems like the only thing regulators can target.

    1
    June 7, 2022
  5. John Konopka said:
    To play devil’s advocate, the new whiteboard feature (Freeform) locks out others. I could see a group of friends on FT and doodling with Freeform. If you don’t have an Apple product you aren’t part of the group. Same as Messages.

    1
    June 7, 2022
  6. Rodney Avilla said:
    “ Should you really concentrate all your private information on a device that criminals can so easily tap into?”

    Really? Does he know something nobody else (including criminals) knows?

    2
    June 7, 2022
    • David Emery said:
      I’d be -really curious- to know exactly what device he uses (a) for daily purposes and (b) to store that specific kind of information.

      0
      June 7, 2022
  7. Kirk DeBernardi said:
    “On the other hand, his suggestion that iPhones are particularly insecure is way, way off base.”

    Ho-hum.

    Sloppy and insidious innuendo is nothing new to an AAPL long.

    3
    June 7, 2022
  8. Michael Goldfeder said:
    Lina Khan and Magrethe Vestager said they have been contacted by a substantial number of App Developers who claim that Apple stifles innovation. Accordingly, they are both unimpressed by the 34 Million figure.

    2
    June 7, 2022
    • Greg Lippert said:
      Define substantial. Bakers Dozen?

      0
      June 7, 2022
      • Michael Goldfeder said:
        @ Greg: I’m thinking two. Epic Games and Match.com. Three if you include Spotify. Which personally I don’t given that anyone in the music industry doesn’t think “Abba” counts as a musical group. Therefore, any musical company from Sweden falls into that same bubble gum category as well.

        0
        June 7, 2022
  9. Jonny T said:
    “The Information”. What a joke of a publication, haven’t read anything sensible on it for years. Seems that nonsense is their norm, still.

    0
    June 8, 2022

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