Jamf: A cheaper way to bet on Apple?

What IT departments do for Windows PCs, Jamf does for Apple enterprises.

From Tiernan Ray's "'Apple is going to make some serious inroads' with the M1 Mac, says Jamf CEO Dean Hager" posted Friday on MSN Money:

Dean Hager, head of Jamf, the 18-year-old, Minneapolis-based software firm that went public last July, thinks his company has found a very vibrant parade to get in front of. It's the Apple device parade.

"Apple is going to make some serious inroads with this machine," said Hager during a Zoom meeting with ZDNet, holding up his new M1-based MacBook computer, the machine that Apple introduced in November that is the first of its kind to use Apple's custom-built silicon instead of Intel's x86 chip. It's lightning-fast, he confirms, runs for 18 hours on a charge, and doesn't need a fan.

"It's the greatest computer I've ever used, it's really good," said Hager.

This is not mere fanboy gushing. Hager's business is built on the premise that more and more millennials in business are going to be demanding they get a Mac with their new job. To him, the M1 Mac sweetens the appeal...

"With the new demographics, if you want to hire people, you better be supporting Macs," he contends. Studies Jamf has commissioned say that 70% of college graduates expect to use a Mac when they get into the workforce.

My take: Jamf always struck me as a terrible name for an interesting company. I was reminded of it this week by some guys on the Apple 3.0 Slack who thought the thinly covered stock might make a good speculative investment.

17 Comments

  1. David Emery said:
    Based on my experience watching Corporate IT, I am -very suspicious- over IT management of devices. I watched Corporate IT reboot user machines while they were in the middle of a crash project, download/force bad software and even spyware, and generally make it Much Harder for people to do things because “it’s not our policy.” The big advantage of being a Mac user in a Windows world was that most of the IT idiots had no clue how to do anything on a Mac.

    4
    January 9, 2021
  2. Gregg Thurman said:
    IBM has shown that deploying Macs can reduce the need for IT support to such an extent that, even with the expense of IT support there is a net savings over using Wintels.

    How much longer can corporations hold out against: employee preference, lower cost and increased productivity?

    The M1 Mini and M1 MacBook should, and I think will, accelerate Mac adoption in the enterprise.

    2
    January 9, 2021
    • David Emery said:
      When I was at MITRE, we could -measure- the costs of Mac vs PC. The best data was Y2K remediation (but there was other data, particularly the # of IT people/Windows vs # of IT people/Mac.) IT charged 1 hour for a Windows machine. I don’t know anyone whose machine was done in less than 2 hours, and the record was the guy down for 3 days. The charge for Macs was 30 minutes, most of us did it ourselves in less than 15 minutes (and most of that work was installing the required MS Office patches :-), we generally wouldn’t trust IT to touch our machines. They did have one competent Mac tech, he was used for hardware problems and “consulting” when we hit a problem the community couldn’t solve. The Mac community at MITRE was mostly self-sustaining. Eventually there was a new CIO, and the Mac went back to being fully accepted and supported. My machine was I think 5 years old when I left MITRE, before the new CIO. On a related note, for part of that time I was on a project with something like 80% travel. I think I was the only person whose laptop lasted 3 years, although it did go in for a repair just before AppleCare ran out. I dropped it off at the Newport Beach CA Apple store late Thursday afternoon, and picked it up the following Tuesday at the Tyson’s Corner Apple store.

      In a lot of companies, power is measured by “the staff who report to you.” By that measure, Windows/Microsoft was good for CIOs, it justified larger staff.

      2
      January 9, 2021
  3. Jerry Doyle said:
    “…. If more and more people are spending some or all of their time at home, putting money into employee productivity may involve giving people the computer they want. ‘If you’re not going to put money into facilities, all of a sudden, the technology experience is the employee experience,’ said Hager.”

    “…. Apple is going to make some serious inroads with this machine, said Hager during a Zoom meeting with ZDNet, holding up his new M1-based MacBook computer, the machine that Apple introduced in November that is the first of its kind to use Apple’s custom-built silicon instead of Intel’s x86 chip. It’s lightning-fast, he confirms, runs for 18 hours on a charge, and doesn’t need a fan.”

    This is just another in a series of testimonies and recognition how the M1 in Macs coupled with the new normal of WFA and adult EFH is going to effect Apple’s increased market share with its new Macs. The PC era is alive and well except that personal computer era is going to become more an era of young workers demanding Macs as the machine to do their work. This new generational transformation over to Macs and of Employers willingness to accommodate tomorrow’s workforce means ever increasing Mac market share and increased Apple revenues for this segment of Apple’s business going forward.

    4
    January 9, 2021
    • Gregg Thurman said:
      * ! * ! * ! *

      Stars, Exclamation Points, and an upvote.

      1
      January 9, 2021
  4. Fred Stein said:
    Yup. Looks like Thomas, Gregg, and I said much the same on Morgan Stanley post.

    It’s bigger still. Children, even in grade school, will grow up all Apple.

    2
    January 9, 2021
    • David Emery said:
      The appeal for Chromebooks for educational use is pretty strong. That’s both a cost incentive and a “they do what we need” incentive. I would be hard pressed if I was a school CIO to recommend Macs over Chromebooks until high school. The more interesting debate would be Chromebook vs iPad, and I’d be inclined to go for Chromebooks in part because of the built-in keyboard. “Typing” is an essential life skill.

      3
      January 9, 2021
      • Jerry Doyle said:
        @ David Emery: “…. The appeal for Chromebooks for educational use is pretty strong. That’s both a cost incentive and a ‘they do what we need’ incentive.”

        Your comment is spot-on David. At the elementary and secondary levels of education School Boards still go for the cheapest costs and for now, that is Chromebooks. Where I see Macs making in-roads is in student higher education and vocational skills training environments. We also are going to see ever increasing adult long distance education, continuing education and new adult skills set training where these individuals will have the discretion, desire and decision to use premium devices as the Macs. So, in education and in continuing education it is in the higher education and vocational skills set training areas where Macs will have the advantage, not at the elementary and secondary levels. Governments (except for the Defense Department) always go for the cheapest pieces of crap available.

        2
        January 9, 2021
        • David Emery said:
          “Governments (except for the Defense Department) always go for the cheapest pieces of crap available.” It’s tough to make a ‘best value’ versus ‘cheapest acquisition cost’ argument (even in DoD). Part of the problem is the lack of data. Another problem is that ‘future cost avoidance’ is not easy to balance against ‘hit to this year’s budget’. (What I’ve seen in some DoD contexts is “we project a life-cycle cost avoidance of $x” and the budget people say, “Great, we’ll reduce -this year’s budget- by $x.” Another time the budget people said to 2 different programs, “You both do the same thing. So we’ll take all the money from each of your programs.” Our response was “We do similar things in very different environments.” We ended up saving our money, but it was a real fight! )

          3
          January 9, 2021
  5. Fred Stein said:
    Just read the full article. Jamf has a great service and business.

    Note to self: Add to investment ideas list.

    3
    January 9, 2021
    • Robert Paul Leitao said:
      Fred: Agreed. It’s already on my watch list. It’s thinly covered. I’m doing research.

      1
      January 9, 2021
  6. David Baraff said:
    I am sorry, but we use jamf at Pixar to manage deployment of software to macs and iPads.

    In terms of reliability and doing what it exists to do Jamf is a four letter word where I work…

    Or a much longer word: “Jaaaaaammmmffff!”, screamed at the top of your voice, in your best Kirk in Wrath of Kahn style…

    5
    January 9, 2021
    • Robert Paul Leitao said:
      David: Wow. The Wrath of Kahn. It brings back memories. I remember seeing the movie in the theater. Definitely a Star Trek classic!

      1
      January 9, 2021
    • Tommo_UK said:
      @David How much of this is due to the way Jamf is integrated into Pixar’s MDM structure, and how much is due to poor processes and design by Jamf?

      I’m genuinely curious but naturally understand any reticence you may have at telling us how you really feel (as if “The Wrath of Kahn” wasn’t enough of a clue) 🙂

      0
      January 10, 2021
  7. David Baraff said:
    Obviously, don’t take my frustration at the platform as investment advice of course. It might indeed be a good thing to invest in, I have no clue.

    1
    January 9, 2021
  8. bas flik said:
    jamf its not really popular in the investment world if you look at the graph. one way down. while rest of overhyped software ipo market is up.
    18 year never making any profit.
    to me a private equity scam like almost every ipo this year.
    18 year is also old for a cloud company. this means old software.
    i experienced my self how quickly software can become obselete
    especially in the cloud.
    and what about scalability.
    all those losses i am afraid is due to lack of scalability and to much acquisition costs.
    first i want to see some profit.

    1
    January 9, 2021
    • Troy Thoman said:
      yep. great analysis… Just because Mac and iPhone install base is growing doesn’t mean they will. Another competitor with newer code and a better idea could just as easily replace them… especially with M1 rolling out. Buy good companies, not just someone in a line of business that could be good.

      1
      January 9, 2021

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