Apple AirPods in the news

Link to retweets.

My take: This is how having white little things sticking out of your ear becomes socially acceptable.

12 Comments

    • Grady Campbell said:
      I missed it at first: it’s a parody account! (so an allusion to not holding the iPhone (4?) correctly)

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      December 2, 2020
  1. Romeo A Esparrago Jr said:
    AirPods Pro is one of three Apple products recommended by CNN in its article “ 51 of the best holiday gifts to give (or get) this year” 🙂

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    December 2, 2020
  2. Jerry Doyle said:
    Parody? No, I take Jony at his word. Steve would have made a similar comment, and did 🙂

    These men were (are) “perfectionist!” Remember?

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    December 2, 2020
  3. David Emery said:
    “You’re wearing it wrong” fake Steve Jobs 🙂 🙂

    1
    December 2, 2020
  4. Kirk DeBernardi said:
    I’ve got to jump in here.

    AirPods have extremely well-balanced and naturally accurate sound, especially with the voice frequencies, which — along with the convenience — attests to their universal success. (Amazing what the pursuit of proper sound can bring).

    However, AirPods Pro, while providing more fine detail and warmth, I believe need to be augmented by using certain EQ (equalizer) settings in Settings > Music > EQ. I tend to use Treble Boost • Jazz • Acoustic • Rock • Classical.

    One not need to match what genre of music you’re listening to with its corresponding EQ setting, but moreover what sounds most natural and accurate for playback. You could easily listen to jazz music on the “Rock” EQ setting.

    When I first tried the AirPods Pro, I was ready to send them back as they didn’t — out of the box — have the sweet spot for the music playback. They are amazingly good when they get equalized. Equalizing generally finely polishes a detail quotient that isn’t available out-of-the-box.

    The best audio systems generally need not to be equalized at all as that is inherently a hallmark of good audio performance.

    You owe it to yourself to give it a spin.

    ( — IMPORTANT — The EQ settings ONLY apply to playback through the Music app.)

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    December 2, 2020
    • Kirk DeBernardi said:
      It’s all about trying to hit reality in sound.

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      December 2, 2020
      • Jerry Doyle said:
        Your comments coming from a man who has a HomePod in every room of a two story home plus HomePods in his Laundry room and garage, I always sit-up and take note of your advisement and consultation when it comes to quality music sound. You’re the music aficionado Kirk D 🙂

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        December 2, 2020
        • Kirk DeBernardi said:
          @ Jerry D.

          Good music and playback = good fun — 😉

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          December 2, 2020
  5. Bart Yee said:
    Kirk, while I agree with your general comments on audio reproduction, it’s very important to remember all acoustic listening environments are very different and present challenges to optimizing the listening experience – room dimensions, furniture, reflectivity and absorbtivity of room surfaces, and room modes and nodes.

    The same applies to the more intimate in or on ear experience due to variations in ear canals, pinnae, and tympanic membrane / hearing apparatus response. It’s also quite instructive to get a bona fide hearing test and evaluation to see just how much our hearing has degraded or deviated from the nominally “perfect” (if it ever was) of our youth. Age, loud or chronic sound exposure, thickening or scarring of the TM, tinnitus and even medication side effects can drastically affect our sound perceptions and our complementary hearing response from theoretical flat 20-20khz. continued.

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    December 2, 2020
  6. Bart Yee said:
    I agree that appropriate eq is a start to approach “flat” listening response and perception. Trouble is, flat doesn’t always “sound good” as our tastes and musical interests may lead us to alternate equalization curves or preferences.

    Lastly, once you have your eq settings adjusted to your taste, important to remember that others with different hearing curves may hear your selection very very differently. Example, I’ve lost a lot of HF above 8-10Khz, so a boost of those frequencies is needed for me to hear overtones and “air”. But that might prove intolerably bright for others. That’s why even at flat, two people hearing the same system may perceive it very differently. Some people are also exquisitely sensitive to certain frequencies (their own node or resonances) so even a flat system may sound harsh to them.

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    December 2, 2020
    • Kirk DeBernardi said:
      @ Bart Yee —

      Thanks for bringing that to the table.

      I didn’t want to do too deep a dive (lest we bore the crowd) into the elements, capabilities and limitations of human hearing, but people should be aware of these points.

      An even larger variable in the quest for accurate sound is the first-step — engineering of the sound recorded. Today’s popular music is almost a sculpted creation, not one of high fidelity to an original sound emanation. Did the trumpet you hear on the recording originate from a blown horn, or was it sculpted from computer bits?

      I prefer to use the natural “I’ll know it when I hear it” type of Holy Grail search when it comes getting ever so close to audio reality. One only needs to make an effort to go there,

      I could go on and on, but we’ve come a long way in the history of recorded sound and now a great potential resides, waiting there in our pockets. While many obstacles are in the way — starting, as you say, with our imperfect hearing — one can easily come satisfyingly close.

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      December 2, 2020

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