Apple, admitting no guilt, settles iPhone throttling suit

“I’m committed to holding these goliath technology companies to account if they conceal the truth from their users.” — Arizona state attorney general

From Tony Romm’s “Apple to pay $113 million to settle state investigation into iPhone ‘batterygate’” posted Wednesday in the Washington Post:

Apple will pay $113 million to settle an investigation by nearly three dozen states into the tech giant’s past practice of slowing customers’ old iPhones in an attempt to preserve their batteries.

The company’s much maligned throttling efforts drew nationwide scorn when they came to light in 2017, stunning consumers who at the time saw it as an attempt to nudge them into buying newer, more expensive devices. States led by Arizona, Arkansas and Indiana soon opened a probe of the matter, and on Wednesday, they secured a financial penalty and legal commitment from Apple to be more transparent in the future.

“Big Tech must stop manipulating consumers and tell them the whole truth about their practices and products,” Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said in a statement. “I’m committed to holding these goliath technology companies to account if they conceal the truth from their users.”

My take: Give that man a slingshot!

See also: Apple swapped out 11 million iPhone batteries

11 Comments

  1. David Emery said:
    There’s nothing worse than a state attorney general out to make political points!

    3
    November 18, 2020
  2. Alan Hochstein said:
    I rarely respond to articles, but since I am an electrical engineer, I think Apple was correct in throttling the processor so that the phone would not die while a customer was in the middle of making a 911 call. If you look at most modern processors, when they start to overheat, the speed is slowed down to protect the hardware. What Apple did is no different.

    3
    November 18, 2020
  3. Gregg Thurman said:
    My take: Give that man a slingshot!

    Give that man another soap box. The box he’s standing on now isn’t big enough for his ego.

    2
    November 18, 2020
  4. Lalit Jagtap said:
    I am happy that Apple is admitting its mistake, and enriching its culture. Everyone makes mistakes, I have faith that Team Apple will not repeat such a mistake again.

    0
    November 18, 2020
  5. Robert Stack said:
    As I understand this situation, the issue isn’t so much that Apple slowed things down but instead that they did not disclose that they were slowing things down (and the reason why). This allowed others to discover and define the problem and ascribe a phony rationale (Apple is slowing things down so you think you need a new phone!). If only Apple had been open about this, they likely would have been applauded for taking this action, but instead their culture of secrecy cost them. Lesson learned, I hope!

    2
    November 18, 2020
  6. Thomas Larkin said:
    How many people were actually “outraged” by not being told about this simple behind the scenes measure to keep people’s phones from crashing, I wonder?

    1
    November 18, 2020
    • David Emery said:
      Do I answer this question from before or after I get contacted by the class action law firm?

      2
      November 18, 2020
    • Kirk DeBernardi said:
      @ Thomas Larkin —

      Best point yet.

      0
      November 19, 2020
  7. Jerry Doyle said:
    Let’s see…. 3 years litigation by 36 states and settlement of 113M. That’s about 3M per state, if proportioned in settlement.

    When I think of all the fraud, abuse and crimes perpetrated daily on unsuspecting consumers through lifting of their savings, false storm damaged repairs or no repairs, the extensive pollutant & chemicals released & sustained by communities, neighborhoods, & into the nations rivers & streams, defective products sold on the markets, etc., etc., then this suit seems petty.

    If I’m not mistaken, Apple subsequently replaced affected folk’s old batteries with new ones a couple years back. Why are we even here today with this settlement?

    3
    November 18, 2020
  8. Thomas Larkin said:
    State sponsored shake down, because they can?

    1
    November 18, 2020

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