Blogger calls Bloomberg out for anti-Apple bias

“Skip the sensational headlines and long-winded narratives, and report what is going on.” — Neil Cybart to Mark Gurman et al.

From the conclusion of “Apple Pushing Additional iPhone Promos,” mailed Wednesday to Above Avalon ($) subscribers:

Th[is] article is a prime example of what has unfortunately become the norm for Bloomberg. A few tidbits of news and information, which are interesting and worth discussing, end up being twisted into long-winded narratives containing either questionable or false assertions and facts. 

For example, Bloomberg claimed in its article:

  • Apple lost 20% of its market value due to “signs on waning iPhone demand”
  • Apple has been raising product prices simply to boost revenue.

Those are opinions, stated as facts.

Bloomberg goes off the rails to say: “Finding another hit like the iPhone will be almost impossible.” Given Bloomberg’s stance, I suggest they read “Connecting the Apple Dots,” the weekly Above Avalon article published after Apple’s September event.

The writers then go over why Apple finds itself at a disadvantage with every one of its major R&D projects.

All of this in an article that was supposedly about Apple launching new retail promotions for iPhone.

Ultimately, Bloomberg is doing a disservice to its readers and viewers. When you yell “fire” at everything, the warning eventually loses its effectiveness.

My hope is that Bloomberg ratchets down the cynicism and instead gets back to genuine reporting. Skip the sensational headlines and long-winded narratives, and report what is going on.

My take: Join the club.

See also:

12 Comments

  1. David Emery said:

    Negative coverage on Apple brings in the clicks. Don’t expect this to change anytime soon. Bloomberg is just “responding to market forces.”

    3
    December 5, 2018
  2. Fred Stein said:

    If it bleeds it leads. Sadly that is the state of so much media, new and old, covering politics and finance. The term yellow journalism dates back to the 1890’s.

    I love the trade-in promo concept. The market for used iPhones is big, reported as 134M last FY. By actively engaging in this market Apple builds more direct relationships with the more price sensitive user base. Plus they can sell extended warranty.

    If iPhone ASPs and the GM falls, that’s fine. As an investor, Apple’s stronger ties to more customers is worth the small margin hit.

    3
    December 5, 2018
    • Gregg Thurman said:

      The market for used iPhones is big, reported as 134M last FY.

      There’s a reason why Apple initiated the “one year trade up” purchase agreement 3 (4?) years ago. The demand for Apple “refurb” iPhones is as large (larger?) than it is for new iPhones. Each one of those “trade-ins” makes possible the sale of a new iPhone.

      0
      December 5, 2018
  3. George Knott said:

    I am so tired of the Apple negative synsational opinions treated as facts, so, I cancelled my renewal of Bloomberg Magazine expiring this month.. It’s another CNBC “Anti Apple”….next…

    5
    December 5, 2018
  4. Fred Stein said:

    I read Gurman’s article. No info. No insight. Mostly rehash, speculation, nonsense and the old SmartPhone market peaking rubbish*. Gurman’s inside sources have dried up. He’s just another Opinioneer.

    Offering rebates and selling refurbed iPhones makes sense. The vast majority of new iPhone buyers replace a serviceable and marketable iPhone.

    *Rubbish because pre-teens will soon have iPhones, hand-me-down or used. Apple’s IB increased by 20% last year. All of this flies under the radar of IDC and Gartner.

    3
    December 5, 2018
  5. Fred Stein said:

    If it bleeds it leads. Sadly that is the state of so much media, new and old, covering politics and finance. The term yellow journalism dates back to the 1890’s.

    0
    December 5, 2018
  6. Gregg Thurman said:

    OT

    Is the Android market ready for handsets that cost $200 more?

    https://www.cnet.com/news/5g-phones-service-will-cost-you-samsung-verizon-att-almost-admit/#ftag=CAD590a51e

    I’m expecting 5G iPhones in FY2020 when 5G radio pricing comes down and the 5G network is more fully fleshed in. Being first to market, in this case, has no benefit.

    If Apple doesn’t have to raise the price on its 5G iPhones. I don’t think Android users will pay the extra $200, instead will look long and hard at iPhones.

    0
    December 5, 2018

Leave a Reply