Fake news and Apple FUD from Forbes

Ewan Spence does it again.

Two Forbes headlines:

Both sourced to Nikkei Asian Review:

How 10% is worse than 30% is a problem whose solution Spence leaves to the reader.

See also:

13 Comments

  1. David Kettle said:

    APPLE SLOWS PRODUCTION FOLLOWING HOLIDAY SEASON!!!

    Wow, this guy is sharp.

    2
    January 2, 2017
  2. Robert Varipapa said:

    Forbes is the Breitbart of Tech – lots of click bait

    3
    January 2, 2017
  3. Tom Wyrick said:

    I wouldn’t defend a (Forbes) article that reports on predictable events like a post-holiday iPhone production cut as highly newsworthy, but I don’t see falsehoods that deserve the label of “fake.” The only specific suggestion of fakery is this statement: “How 10% is worse than 30% is a problem whose solution Spence leaves to the reader.”

    As far as I can tell, however, Mr. Spence does not say or suggest that a 10% production cut is “worse” than 30%. But if he does, PED could easily provide a specific quote from the Spence article to prove his case — instead of leaving it to readers to figure out what he is driving at.

    The current article falsely attributes year-ago reports about iPhone 6s to January 2015 and reports about iPhone 7 to 2016.

    0
    January 2, 2017
    • “The current article falsely attributes year-ago reports about iPhone 6s to January 2015 and reports about iPhone 7 to 2016.”

      Fixed. Thanks for catching that.

      0
      January 2, 2017
    • Ewan Spence is an old hand at this. He’s been a DJ. He’s been an editor. He’s hosted podcasts. He’s run a podcast network. He knows better. As far as I can tell, his only purpose here was to rack up clicks (93,000 so far) and milk his old stuff for a few more.

      But in Spence’s defense he wasn’t the source of what I was would would term “false news”—disinformation posted with malice aforethought. That was Nikkei Asian Review’s doing. This not the first time I’ve seen the Nikkei release a flimsy piece of Apple FUD just before lot of Apple options were scheduled to expire.

      As Prof. Wyrick points out, reports of (smaller than last year!) post-holiday iPhone production cuts are not news—or newsworthy—unless what you’re trying to do is put your thumb on the scale.

      3
      January 2, 2017
  4. John Kirk said:

    Malicious gossip is like a vampire. The light of reason turns it to ashes. So it retreats to the shadows where it survives and continues to suck. ~ John R. Kirk

    2
    January 2, 2017
  5. Robert Paul Leitao said:

    Apple asks suppliers to guarantee production capacity that may be greater than the volume of eventual orders. The first question to be asked when reading claims of production cuts is whether or not these are actual production cuts or clarifications of actual order volume.

    Second, the last time March quarter iPhone unit sales exceeded December quarter unit sales was in FY2011. In that year shipments totaled 72.293 million units or less units in the entire year than Apple will report as shipped in the recent December quarter alone. It’s expected iPhone unit sales will decline sequentially. As supply-demand equilibrium is reached each year, either late in the December quarter or early in the March quarter, it’s expected for order volume to decline.

    Last year March quarter unit sales declined 32% sequentially as Apple reached supply-demand equilibrium late in the December quarter and added 3.3 million units to global channel supply before the end of the period. In FY2015, March quarter unit sales declined by 18% as supply-demand equilibrium wasn’t reached until well into the March quarter.

    If the referenced report of 10% production cuts from peak demand are in any way accurate, it would be a bullish indicator and would suggest iPhone 7 demand in the first six months of this fiscal year may rival demand for FY2015’s original iPhone 6 series in the first six months of that fiscal year. Apple is expected to report record iPhone unit sales for the December quarter. If production demand declines only 10% sequentially as we enter the March quarter, it’s an indicator Apple did not reach supply equilibrium in the December quarter as demand remains high.

    A potentially bullish indicator reported as some kind of dire prognostication of a product’s failure is fake news at its best and superficial reporting about Apple (almost) at its worst.

    3
    January 2, 2017
  6. William Kortum said:

    Spence is consistently negative on Apple – enough so that I’d wonder whether his animosity is genuine or financed by Apple’s competition or some other source with an axe to grind. In Forbes’ defense, it should be mentioned that they have one of the best Apple commentators: Chuck Jones of Sand Hill Resources. Haven’t seen many recent posts by Mr Jones, but they are worth your time when and if they pop up. The current advertising situation & the Internet are playing havoc with traditionally edited journalism’s business model. I expect there will be a huge price to be paid by consumers down the road. Mr Trump, it’s unfortunately your move.

    0
    January 2, 2017

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