Tit for tat on the future of the Mac

Who ya going to believe, Tim Cook or Mark Gurman?

Tim Cook in a corporate Q&A leaked to TechCrunch:

Some folks in the media have raised the question about whether we’re committed to desktops. If there’s any doubt about that with our teams, let me be very clear: we have great desktops in our roadmap. Nobody should worry about that.

Mark Gurman the next morning in Bloomberg:

Mac fans shouldn’t hold their breath for radical new designs in 2017 though. Instead, the company is preparing modest updates: USB-C ports and a new Advanced Micro Devices Inc. graphics processor for the iMac, and minor bumps in processing power for the 12-inch MacBook and MacBook Pro. Cue the outrage.

Another year without a Mac Pro upgrade? Cue the video (June 2013):

12 Comments

  1. Richard Wanderman said:

    The quote in that piece that caught my eye (among many others) was this:

    “In another sign that the company has prioritized the iPhone, Apple re-organized its software engineering department so there’s no longer a dedicated Mac operating system team. There is now just one team, and most of the engineers are iOS first, giving the people working on the iPhone and iPad more power.”

    Apple is a big enough company with enough human and financial resources so that one would think they’d be able to have two or more software divisions.

    1
    December 20, 2016
    • John Kirk said:

      “Apple is a big enough company with enough human and financial resources so that one would think they’d be able to have two or more software divisions.”

      Well, this is one of the things that distinguishes Apple from all others. Small companies have functional organizational structures and big companies have divisions…except for Apple. Apple is the only large company I know of that has a functional, not a divisional, structure.

      Not having divisions has its drawbacks, but it is also one of Apple’s strengths. Abandon it and you abandon what makes Apple unique. And uniquely successful.

      1
      December 20, 2016
  2. George Ewonus said:

    Oh yeah. I am definitely going to believe Mark Gurman!? Written on my new MacBook Pro 2016 – an amazing machine, thank you, Tim and company!

    1
    December 20, 2016
    • Gregg Thurman said:

      Gurman no longer writes because he has something intelligent to say, he writes because his employer needs content, no matter what it is.

      1
      December 20, 2016
  3. Gregg Thurman said:

    Pure and simple Apple is going to devote resources to the products that are selling.

    Here’s a partial list of what Apple used to manufacture, but don’t anymore:

    Imagewriter
    Imagewriter LQ
    Laserwriter (several models_
    iPods
    Newtons
    Cameras
    Appletalk
    Displays/monitors
    Airport Extreme
    Airport Express

    Back in 1996/1997 the creative community was extremely important to Apple. Without them NOBODY would have been buying Macs. But times have changed. Non-commercial use of Macs has dropped, because of the iPhone and uPad. Without EXPANDING commercial use of Macs there would be little reason to do other than milk the line. Enter Apple’s ENTERPRISE initiatives via IBM et al.

    The majority of enterprise sales will be iPhones and iPads. Desktop technology has reached a point that far exceeds average enterprise and non-commercial needs. Even among the creative community, the need is not so much for faster Macs, as it is for processors that can handle the latest version of MacOS. The laggard there is Intel, not Apple.

    Apple continues to sell about 20 Million Macs per year, a number that will expand with Apple’s new found interest in the enterprise.

    Is Apple going to let the Mac wither away? Absolutely not.

    The angst reported in the media about the current state of Mac development comes from a small, vocal and IGNORANT group within the creative community that has screamed for more power since before I bought my first Mac Plus in 1987, an issue that has always fallen at the feet of processor manufacturers (Intel and Motorola).

    1
    December 20, 2016
    • Richard Wanderman said:

      Sorry, but you’re wrong and I resent being called “ignorant.”

      I’ve been using the Mac since 1984, most of that time professionally and at least some of that time consulting for Apple. Independent of machines and specs, how Apple has dropped support for professional users is alarming to me as it is to other professional users.

      Those of us who are concerned about this are not enterprise users who will use an iPad to query a mainframe, we’re independent business people who use Macs in a variety of ways. I do fine art printing and while I understand why Apple got out of the laser printer business, their printing architecture built into Mac OS has been incredibly buggy for many years now. I get it, no one prints anymore… but in fact, some people actually do print: photographers, graphic designers, architects, and other professionals who use Macs to both run their businesses and process their creative work.

      There are more of us than you seem to imagine and yes, some of us are voicing our concerns, which are real.

      1
      December 20, 2016
      • Gregg Thurman said:

        Richard I apologize for my poor choice of words. What I meant to convey was ignorant in business/manufacturing realities, as I am ignorant of the creative industry, meaning that sometimes (a lot of times) there is a large gap between what the user wants and what can be produced. And sometimes that means changing technologies in favor of the next generation. Yes, doing this puts a burden on the user. But changes like this have never put a firm willing bro invest in the future out of business. To the contrary, changes like this expand users’ opportunities.

        That said, I stand by the rest of my post.

        1
        December 20, 2016
  4. Fred Stein said:

    Both are right .. if you understand their perspective. Of course Tim Cook will say any future products will be “great”. And Mac won’t not offer a ‘radical new design’ because doing so makes no sense. Apple’s innovations will continue on the “i”OS plus the associated chips – A, M, S, W, and ? deployed in new form factors for new applications.And these innovation will be greeted with cheers and jeers from the usual suspects.

    Otherwise, the Mac line, under $1299 needs improvement, soon, please.

    0
    December 21, 2016
  5. Gregg Thurman said:

    Anytime Product “A”;s marketing team refers to Product “B” in favorable sales number comparisons Product “A” is failing.

    IBM, Cisco, Deloit and SAP have not partnered with Microsoft to offer the Surface to the Enterprise.

    I really think the Surface is a make or break product for Microsoft. Absolutely nothing came of the Zune and/or the Nokia acquisition.. If the Surface fails to grab significant share in the next 24 months I believe Microsoft will become a relic of the past.

    1
    December 21, 2016

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